Phil Mickelson lines up a putt on the 18th green during his second round 69 on day two of the 2016 British Open Golf Championship at Royal Troon in Scotland on July 15. (Andy Buchanan/AFP/Getty Images)

Phil Mickelson lines up a putt on the 18th green during his second round 69 on day two of the 2016 British Open Golf Championship at Royal Troon in Scotland on July 15. (Andy Buchanan/AFP/Getty Images)

TROON, SCOTLAND—Playing golf in Scotland is a game of constant adjustments—few things remain the same for long. The 145th Open Championship at Royal Troon has clearly experienced a 360-degree difference between the first and second rounds as the famous Scottish expression “nay wind, nay rain, nay golf” was ringing in the ears of all the competitors during Friday’s second round.
 
In round one benign weather was on the climate menu—the wind simply not a factor for the bulk of the day. As a result, players took advantage of the near endless opportunities to post numerous sub-par rounds. American Phil Mickelson led the way with a stellar major championship record tying 63 that was nearly a 62 as his final putt lipped out at the 18th hole.
 
Less than 24 hours later those same conditions turned dramatically. Wind and rain was the order of the day, intensifying as the day progressed. The outward half of holes which played Read Full Article

Source: The Epoch Times » Sports